MPS Journalism

Dec 04

Peter Schroeder (G ‘10)
Twitter: @peteschroeder
 
“Sometimes you can feel more like a referee or a marriage counselor than a reporter, but one of the perks of the job is getting to hear the best arguments from all sides in an attempt to nail down the truth.”
MPS Journalism Ambassador Peter Schroeder graduated from the program in Summer 2010 and currently works as a Staff Writer at The Hill. His specialty is covering financial issues and politics. Peter worked in DC journalism prior to starting the program and shared with us how the program rounded out his journalism skill set.MPS Journalism: Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has impacted and/or changed your career.Peter Schroeder: I was already working in the journalism field when I began Georgetown’s MPS Journalism program, but had not received any formal training in the field. The years I spent at Georgetown allowed me to not only cover those gaps in my understanding, but also gave me the chance to try out a range of different storytelling techniques and mediums that my day job would not allow. Furthermore, taking classes at Georgetown gave me the chance to interact on a regular basis with faculty who spend their days working in the journalism industry, gaining invaluable insight and professional contacts along the way.”MPS JO: Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?PS: I heard about the program just as it was starting from a friend, and was immediately interested. Getting the chance to further my academic training at a place like Georgetown, with its great history, was an obvious plus. At the same time, it was exciting to be joining a program that was just getting its feet under it, before things became too calcified and rigid. The combination of historic achievement coupled with that start-up appeal made for an enticing combination.MPS JO: Who is your favorite working journalist?PS: It’s impossible to pick just one, because the field is so wide and varied and is getting more so every day. There are scores of hard-working, very smart people cranking out quality work. But there are particular names I’ll always make an effort to read when they produce something. Michael Lewis, Robert Draper and Matt Bai consistently crank out excellent long-form pieces on complex issues that are as illuminating as they are entertaining.MPS JO: How did you balance your work, life and school responsibilities while in the program?PS: It can definitely be a challenge juggling everything, especially when studying journalism. The biggest obstacle is that most classwork in a journalism class involves doing journalism, which can’t be achieved during late-night cramming sessions. Fortunately, I had an understanding editor and an understanding wife who knew that sometimes I had to take some time out of my day to line up an interview with a key source for a school project.MPS JO: What one interview for a piece you’ve done has changed your perspective on a topic/issue/etc.?PS: It’s hard to nail down a particular interview, not because it hasn’t happened, but because it happens so often. One of the great things about this job is that you get to talk to lots of people who know issues inside and out and listen to them make their case. You’ll often find yourself in the middle of a heated debate and hear about an issue from two or more sides. Sometimes you can feel more like a referee or a marriage counselor than a reporter, but one of the perks of the job is getting to hear the best arguments from all sides in an attempt to nail down the truth.MPS JO: What one piece of advice would you give current students?PS: Be open to everything. Taking classes in the program offers a top-notch opportunity to try out a wide variety of approaches to journalism. I took an audio/photography production class and a video production class, despite the fact that I was working in print journalism and had every intention of staying in the written field. These days, it never hurts to have a baseline of skill in a wide range of approaches. Beyond that, take advantage of the faculty and the advice they have to offer. Since they are all working journalists, they have the direct experience you are trying to achieve, so listen up.

Peter Schroeder (G ‘10)

Twitter: @peteschroeder

 

“Sometimes you can feel more like a referee or a marriage counselor than a reporter, but one of the perks of the job is getting to hear the best arguments from all sides in an attempt to nail down the truth.”


MPS Journalism Ambassador Peter Schroeder graduated from the program in Summer 2010 and currently works as a Staff Writer at The Hill. His specialty is covering financial issues and politics. Peter worked in DC journalism prior to starting the program and shared with us how the program rounded out his journalism skill set.

MPS Journalism: Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has impacted and/or changed your career.
Peter Schroeder: I was already working in the journalism field when I began Georgetown’s MPS Journalism program, but had not received any formal training in the field. The years I spent at Georgetown allowed me to not only cover those gaps in my understanding, but also gave me the chance to try out a range of different storytelling techniques and mediums that my day job would not allow. Furthermore, taking classes at Georgetown gave me the chance to interact on a regular basis with faculty who spend their days working in the journalism industry, gaining invaluable insight and professional contacts along the way.”

MPS JO: Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?
PS: I heard about the program just as it was starting from a friend, and was immediately interested. Getting the chance to further my academic training at a place like Georgetown, with its great history, was an obvious plus. At the same time, it was exciting to be joining a program that was just getting its feet under it, before things became too calcified and rigid. The combination of historic achievement coupled with that start-up appeal made for an enticing combination.

MPS JO: Who is your favorite working journalist?
PS: It’s impossible to pick just one, because the field is so wide and varied and is getting more so every day. There are scores of hard-working, very smart people cranking out quality work. But there are particular names I’ll always make an effort to read when they produce something. Michael LewisRobert Draper and Matt Bai consistently crank out excellent long-form pieces on complex issues that are as illuminating as they are entertaining.

MPS JO: How did you balance your work, life and school responsibilities while in the program?
PS: It can definitely be a challenge juggling everything, especially when studying journalism. The biggest obstacle is that most classwork in a journalism class involves doing journalism, which can’t be achieved during late-night cramming sessions. Fortunately, I had an understanding editor and an understanding wife who knew that sometimes I had to take some time out of my day to line up an interview with a key source for a school project.

MPS JO: What one interview for a piece you’ve done has changed your perspective on a topic/issue/etc.?
PS: It’s hard to nail down a particular interview, not because it hasn’t happened, but because it happens so often. One of the great things about this job is that you get to talk to lots of people who know issues inside and out and listen to them make their case. You’ll often find yourself in the middle of a heated debate and hear about an issue from two or more sides. Sometimes you can feel more like a referee or a marriage counselor than a reporter, but one of the perks of the job is getting to hear the best arguments from all sides in an attempt to nail down the truth.

MPS JO: What one piece of advice would you give current students?
PS: Be open to everything. Taking classes in the program offers a top-notch opportunity to try out a wide variety of approaches to journalism. I took an audio/photography production class and a video production class, despite the fact that I was working in print journalism and had every intention of staying in the written field. These days, it never hurts to have a baseline of skill in a wide range of approaches. Beyond that, take advantage of the faculty and the advice they have to offer. Since they are all working journalists, they have the direct experience you are trying to achieve, so listen up.

Nov 06

MPS Journalism Alum of the Month - November 2012

Katie Bridges (G ‘12)

Contact Information: Website: www.kathleenbridges.com, Twitter:@kathleenbridges, Facebook: "Katie Bridges"
Take advantage of every opportunity that the MPS Journalism program presents to you.”

We are proud to feature one of our Summer 2012 graduates from the MPS Journalism program, Katie Bridges, as our November Alum of the Month. Since finishing the program, Katie moved to Little Rock, Arkansas where she works as the Editor of Arkansas Life, a monthly lifestyle magazine. Katie shares with us how her career took a 180 after starting the MPS Journalism program.

1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has impacted and/or changed your career.

“Had I not been part of the MPS Journalism community, there’s absolutely no way I’d be in the position that I’m in today. I was a career-changer, and needed a way to make an entry - quickly - into the field. Thanks to the dedication of the MPS JO faculty and staff, I landed my dream internship at Washingtonian magazine after my first year, which quickly became a full-time gig. After relocating to Little Rock at the end of my final semester, I was offered the editorship at Arkansas Life magazine. I’m sure that without my degree and my experience at the Washingtonian, that position would not have been available to me!”

2. Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?

“I was looking for a program that would introduce me to prominent working journalists, and that would fill my portfolio with professional-quality clips. Needless to say, I was impressed by both the faculty line-up and the practical nature of the course offerings. I think I made a good choice.”

3. Who is your favorite working journalist?

“My capstone adviser, Howard Yoon, once told me that every good magazine is reflective of the personality and vision of its editor, and I couldn’t agree more. Perhaps it’s because I’ve recently moved to the editing side of the magazine world, but my superheroes right now are folks like Adam Moss at New York magazine and David Dibenedetto at Garden & Gun.”

4. What one interview for a piece you’ve done has had the most impact on you?

“I’d have to go with the interviews that I did for my capstone (which is being published in the December issue of Washingtonian—stay tuned!) with John Uselton and Michael Lowe, the pair behind New Columbia Distillers, DC’s new distillery. I spent many months with them—following them around the distillery, sitting at Lowe’s dining room table as they tweaked their recipe, conversing over countless cups of coffee. That type of immersion reporting allowed me to create a rich narrative and sitting down with months’ worth of material helped me hone my editing skills. If only we always had six months to work on a piece!”

5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?

“Take advantage of every opportunity that the MPS-Jo program presents to you. Seriously. Your professors are more than willing to help make things happen for you - take them up on it!”

Oct 03

MPS Journalism Alum of the Month - October 2012

Kate Chapek (@katechapek)

"Be bold. Be courageous. Be honest. Be you. And above all, know your worth."

With the 2012 U.S. Presidential campaign in full swing, we are featuring Kate Chapek, the National Women Vote Director of Obama’s campaign, as our Alum of the Month for October. Kate graduated from the MPS Journalism program in 2009 and lives in Chicago, IL, where she works to engage women voters and activists to re-elect President Obama. Prior to attending Georgetown, Kate worked as a Regional Coordinator for EMILY’s List and also worked for a few Democratic campaigns. Kate shared with us how she implements what she learned from the MPS Journalism program in her current job.

1. How has your MPS Journalism degree helped you in your current job?
“I use my journalism degree every day. As the National Women Vote Director, my job is to figure out how to best engage women of all constituencies, educating them on the President’s record, persuading them to support him, and turning them out to vote. In order to do this, I am constantly writing plans and recommendations both nationally and by state. As a result much of the audience engagement I do deals with strategic messaging and amplification through media; earned, paid, and of course - new media! I work with our press team, pitching stories and also engage with reporters as I trained to be one and know how they think. Everyday I write, edit, pitch, frame and disseminate messaging.”

2. How did you hear about this program, and why did you choose to come here?
“I earned my BA in Journalism and was looking to for a program that would enhance and update my passion for sharing people’s stories through many different platforms as well as complement my career in electoral politics. Georgetown’s MPS Journalism program was the perfect hybrid and fit for me.”

3. What is your favorite journalism movie?
“This probably doesn’t count - but my own! For my capstone, I wrote, produced, shot and edited a 14 minute short film that took me 300 hours to complete. My documentary was about the DC Central Kitchen and their culinary training program which trains the unemployed, underemployed, previously incarcerated, previously drug addicted, and homeless adults for careers in the food service industry. It was as political as it was personal and I earned two awards at the Georgetown Film Festival. They now sit on my mantle.”

4. Who is your favorite working journalist?
“You! I love keeping up with my classmates as knowing where we started and seeing where so many of us are now is truly inspiring. I know that many of my classmates are on their way to running major newspapers, broadcast affiliates and online publications.”

5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?
“Be bold. Be courageous. Be honest. Be you. And above all, know your worth.”

Oct 02

[video]

Sep 07

MPS Journalism Alum of the Month - September 2012
Curtis Eichelberger
New author Curtis Eichelberger (G’09) is our MPS Journalism Alum of the Month for September. Eichelberger currently works as a Sports Reporter at Bloomberg News and his first book, “Men of Sunday,” was just released last month. In “Men of Sunday,” Eichelberger reveals the strong faith of many NFL players and how they embrace their faith in times of difficulty (i.e. drug abuse, family crises, career-ending injuries). Eichelberger interviewed dozens of football stars for his book, including Mike Singletary, Aaron Rodgers, and Tony Dungy, and in our Q&A with him, Eichelberger shares his most memorable interview.1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has impacted and/or changed your career."I was a mid-career journalist when I enrolled in the MPS program in 2007. I had lots of sources, but my technology skills had fallen behind. Think about it - when I graduated from college in 1990, I didn’t know anyone who had a cell phone. The screen on my first laptop was so small it would only let me see five lines of copy at a time and the computer couldn’t hold more than about 10 stories in its memory. After 17 years in the business, it was time to learn new software packages like Excel and Access and to catch up on all the new databases and research tools that help reporters do a better job.Graduate school was also helpful because it allowed me to receive the one-on-one instruction I needed. When you are a young journalist, there are plenty of older reporters and editors who will offer instruction and encourage you to improve. By the time you turn 40, they are asking you to help the youngsters. That’s perfectly fine. I want to give back. But my career is far from over, and I was hungry to work with talented professors who didn’t care about my status at the office. They took my work apart, challenged my reporting and writing every day and pushed me to do better. It was just what I was looking for.”2. Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?"I received a promotional flier in my mailbox at Bloomberg. I had been talking to some of co-workers about the need for additional training and the timing was right. I also liked the flexibility the MPS program offered.When I interviewed with the Dean, she asked how the program could help me become a better journalist. I liked her approach right away. She wasn’t offering me a cookie cutter program. She was willing to address me as an individual and build a program around my particular needs.I took five journalism classes to update my tech and research skills, and provide the one-on-one writing/reporting instruction I needed. And four classes in sports administration that related specific to my day-to-day work issues. The program was tailored perfectly for my needs, which gave me a sense of satisfaction when I left. I didn’t feel any of my courses were wasted. I work long hours, I’m married and I have family responsibilities. There was no time for a “blow off” class that didn’t advance my mission of getting better ASAP.”3. Who is your favorite working journalist?"I’m a big fan of Jason Cole at Yahoo! He’s one of those bulldogs who won’t let go once he’s sniffed out a story. When I was a young person working for the Rocky Mountain News in Denver, I had an older partner who reminded me the day I teamed up with him that we were called “news” reporters for a reason. Write a feature, he said, only after you have failed to find news. For months, he would taunt me with the morning greeting: “What do you have today? Working on any good features?” It was his way of reminding me that if I didn’t break news, I wasn’t doing my job and I wasn’t welcome on the beat. I think Jason probably has a similar attitude, though we are not friends and I say this based only on his body of work.”4. What one interview for a piece you’ve done has had the most impact on you? "I interviewed former Baltimore Ravens quarterback Trent Dilfer, now an analyst at ESPN, about the death of his then-5-year-old son, Trevin.The former Super Bowl champion had the money, a beautiful family, fame … and then his only son caught a virus during a vacation to Disneyland and died 40 days later. (The full story is in my book, Men of Sunday.)It was a reminder to me that we aren’t covering “subjects.” These are human beings with families and pain in their lives too. In trying to keep our distance, we sometimes forget that.”5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?"Journalism is increasingly about specialization. Anyone can be taught to write a few coherent paragraphs, but what else do they bring to the table? Top media outlets hire former Wall Street traders to talk or write about trading, lawyers to report on the legal system, economists and accountants to rifle through company filings and executive compensation.The second thing you might want to give some thought about is a mortgage. When you see your future, are you in a home? What’s it look like? Get on MSN.com, find a house you like and see what it costs. Now, ask yourself if you envision children in your future? Do some quick research to figure out what good private schools cost in the District or what houses cost in suburban neighborhoods where the public schools are good. Calculate college costs (double whatever it is now), a car and oh yes, retirement savings. Then do some more research and find out how much journalists make. The numbers will shock you. OK, now stop. Think real hard and real long about the choices you are about to make. Journalism has provided me with incredible opportunities and life experiences, but I’ve been lucky. I am not the norm. You can always enter journalism with an economics or computer science or law degree, but you can’t become a lawyer, programmer or economist with a journalism degree alone.Dream, but be reasonable. Have a plan. Decide how long you are willing to spend working at becoming a great journalist. But if you are not advancing like you thought, use the considerable skills you will develop in this field to find a job that pays the mortgage and lets you take your spouse and kids out to dinner every once in awhile.”

MPS Journalism Alum of the Month - September 2012

Curtis Eichelberger


New author Curtis Eichelberger (G’09) is our MPS Journalism Alum of the Month for September. Eichelberger currently works as a Sports Reporter at Bloomberg News and his first book, “Men of Sunday,” was just released last month. In “Men of Sunday,” Eichelberger reveals the strong faith of many NFL players and how they embrace their faith in times of difficulty (i.e. drug abuse, family crises, career-ending injuries). Eichelberger interviewed dozens of football stars for his book, including Mike Singletary, Aaron Rodgers, and Tony Dungy, and in our Q&A with him, Eichelberger shares his most memorable interview.

1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has impacted and/or changed your career.
"I was a mid-career journalist when I enrolled in the MPS program in 2007. I had lots of sources, but my technology skills had fallen behind. Think about it - when I graduated from college in 1990, I didn’t know anyone who had a cell phone. The screen on my first laptop was so small it would only let me see five lines of copy at a time and the computer couldn’t hold more than about 10 stories in its memory. After 17 years in the business, it was time to learn new software packages like Excel and Access and to catch up on all the new databases and research tools that help reporters do a better job.

Graduate school was also helpful because it allowed me to receive the one-on-one instruction I needed. When you are a young journalist, there are plenty of older reporters and editors who will offer instruction and encourage you to improve. By the time you turn 40, they are asking you to help the youngsters. That’s perfectly fine. I want to give back. But my career is far from over, and I was hungry to work with talented professors who didn’t care about my status at the office. They took my work apart, challenged my reporting and writing every day and pushed me to do better. It was just what I was looking for.

2. Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?
"I received a promotional flier in my mailbox at Bloomberg. I had been talking to some of co-workers about the need for additional training and the timing was right. I also liked the flexibility the MPS program offered.

When I interviewed with the Dean, she asked how the program could help me become a better journalist. I liked her approach right away. She wasn’t offering me a cookie cutter program. She was willing to address me as an individual and build a program around my particular needs.

I took five journalism classes to update my tech and research skills, and provide the one-on-one writing/reporting instruction I needed. And four classes in sports administration that related specific to my day-to-day work issues. The program was tailored perfectly for my needs, which gave me a sense of satisfaction when I left. I didn’t feel any of my courses were wasted. I work long hours, I’m married and I have family responsibilities. There was no time for a “blow off” class that didn’t advance my mission of getting better ASAP.

3. Who is your favorite working journalist?
"I’m a big fan of Jason Cole at Yahoo! He’s one of those bulldogs who won’t let go once he’s sniffed out a story. When I was a young person working for the Rocky Mountain News in Denver, I had an older partner who reminded me the day I teamed up with him that we were called “news” reporters for a reason. Write a feature, he said, only after you have failed to find news. For months, he would taunt me with the morning greeting: “What do you have today? Working on any good features?” It was his way of reminding me that if I didn’t break news, I wasn’t doing my job and I wasn’t welcome on the beat. I think Jason probably has a similar attitude, though we are not friends and I say this based only on his body of work.

4. What one interview for a piece you’ve done has had the most impact on you?
"I interviewed former Baltimore Ravens quarterback Trent Dilfer, now an analyst at ESPN, about the death of his then-5-year-old son, Trevin.

The former Super Bowl champion had the money, a beautiful family, fame … and then his only son caught a virus during a vacation to Disneyland and died 40 days later. (The full story is in my book, Men of Sunday.)

It was a reminder to me that we aren’t covering “subjects.” These are human beings with families and pain in their lives too. In trying to keep our distance, we sometimes forget that.”

5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?
"Journalism is increasingly about specialization. Anyone can be taught to write a few coherent paragraphs, but what else do they bring to the table? Top media outlets hire former Wall Street traders to talk or write about trading, lawyers to report on the legal system, economists and accountants to rifle through company filings and executive compensation.

The second thing you might want to give some thought about is a mortgage. When you see your future, are you in a home? What’s it look like? Get on MSN.com, find a house you like and see what it costs. Now, ask yourself if you envision children in your future? Do some quick research to figure out what good private schools cost in the District or what houses cost in suburban neighborhoods where the public schools are good. Calculate college costs (double whatever it is now), a car and oh yes, retirement savings. Then do some more research and find out how much journalists make. The numbers will shock you. OK, now stop. Think real hard and real long about the choices you are about to make. Journalism has provided me with incredible opportunities and life experiences, but I’ve been lucky. I am not the norm. You can always enter journalism with an economics or computer science or law degree, but you can’t become a lawyer, programmer or economist with a journalism degree alone.

Dream, but be reasonable. Have a plan. Decide how long you are willing to spend working at becoming a great journalist. But if you are not advancing like you thought, use the considerable skills you will develop in this field to find a job that pays the mortgage and lets you take your spouse and kids out to dinner every once in awhile.

Aug 03

MPS Journalism Alum of the Month - August 2012*Delece Smith-Barrow (G’11)*Contact Information: Twitter: @DeleceWP, LinkedIn: /delecesmithbarrowAfter Delece Smith-Barrow joined the staff of The Washington Post (http://wapo.st/Ps3RwL) in 2008 as a Lifestyles Producer, she decided to head back to school to hone her journalism skills and came to Georgetown. Delece graduated from the Master’s in Journalism program in Fall 2011 and is now working as the Web Editor of The Root DC (http://wapo.st/MD6LQf), a section of The Washington Post for breaking news and commentary about the local African American community. Delece creates and manages an online strategy for the site, writes and edits feature stories (http://wapo.st/NeMnVc) and engages with readers on various social media platforms. Delece shared with us her favorite memories from the program.

1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has helped you in your current job.I have become a much stronger editor because of my years in the program. In many of my classes I helped edit my classmates’ work; an overwhelming task at times but one I am very grateful for. A year after I started the program, I began to edit copy a few times a day for several different people at work. I would have been less prepared for this job without taking Feature Writing, Journalism of Conscience, Journalism of Identity and other courses.2. What is your best memory of being in the MPS Journalism program?My best memory is going to class at the White House. I’ve never been to the White House before. It was a great environment for learning about the White House Press Secretary’s job and his relationship with journalists. 3. What is the last book you’ve read?"The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest" by Stieg Larsson (The Hacker and the Hack)4. Who is your favorite working journalist?Courtland Milloy (https://twitter.com/courtland51)5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?Write as much as you can, and freelance for as many news organizations as you can. You never know which one could be your next employer.

MPS Journalism Alum of the Month - August 2012
*Delece Smith-Barrow (G’11)*

Contact Information: Twitter: @DeleceWP, LinkedIn: /delecesmithbarrow

After Delece Smith-Barrow joined the staff of The Washington Post (http://wapo.st/Ps3RwL) in 2008 as a Lifestyles Producer, she decided to head back to school to hone her journalism skills and came to Georgetown. Delece graduated from the Master’s in Journalism program in Fall 2011 and is now working as the Web Editor of The Root DC (http://wapo.st/MD6LQf), a section of The Washington Post for breaking news and commentary about the local African American community. Delece creates and manages an online strategy for the site, writes and edits feature stories (http://wapo.st/NeMnVc) and engages with readers on various social media platforms. Delece shared with us her favorite memories from the program.


1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has helped you in your current job.

I have become a much stronger editor because of my years in the program. In many of my classes I helped edit my classmates’ work; an overwhelming task at times but one I am very grateful for. A year after I started the program, I began to edit copy a few times a day for several different people at work. I would have been less prepared for this job without taking Feature Writing, Journalism of Conscience, Journalism of Identity and other courses.

2. What is your best memory of being in the MPS Journalism program?
My best memory is going to class at the White House. I’ve never been to the White House before. It was a great environment for learning about the White House Press Secretary’s job and his relationship with journalists. 

3. What is the last book you’ve read?
"The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest" by Stieg Larsson (The Hacker and the Hack)

4. Who is your favorite working journalist?
Courtland Milloy (https://twitter.com/courtland51)

5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?
Write as much as you can, and freelance for as many news organizations as you can. You never know which one could be your next employer.

Jul 20

[video]

Jul 13

[video]

Jul 09

Alum of the Month: July 2012Khalil Garriott (G ‘10)
E-mail: khalil.p.garriott@gmail.com, Twitter: @khalilgarriott LinkedIn: /khalilgarriott, Website: http://khalilgarriott.com/
Khalil Garriott often tackled sports stories while in the MPS Journalism program, so it’s no surprise that he continues to excel in sports writing. Khalil, who graduated from the program in Fall 2010, currently works as a Website Editor for the National Football League Players Association and writes about NFL-related topics ranging from draft picks and Super Bowl champions to league community service and players’ sidelining injuries. Khalil recently won a 2012 Dateline Award for excellence in local journalism for his story about one Super Bowl-winning football team’s long-overdue trip to the White House. He shared with us his personal and professional gains from the program.
1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has helped you in your current job.My Master’s degree in Journalism from Georgetown helped elevate me to assume a greater responsibility in my current position. It also gave me the necessary skills to take on different projects at work plus help pass on what I learned in graduate school to others.2. Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?When the program was created, it immediately shot up on the list of options on my radar. I believe I originally heard about it through an ad placed in the Washington Post Express newspaper. It didn’t hurt that a friend from undergrad was the director of the program at the time, so I was able to learn more about it and quickly knew it was the right choice.
3. Twitter or Facebook?Twitter. The only thing that might make me give in to Facebook is the recent birth of my niece…her parents post pictures and videos of her there, so I may eventually relent!4. Who is your favorite working journalist?Naturally, I’m partial to the ones that cover sports. I have to respect Adam Schefter,Cindy Boren, Mike Florio, Bill Simmons and Rick Reilly. Plus, the Tony Kornheiser-Michael Wilbon duo is still getting it done.5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?Get the most out of the program that you possibly can. Develop and nurture relationships with your classmates, professors and others associated with the program. Stay humble and grounded. Study hard and work hard, but don’t get trapped in the “grad school bubble” and keep your sights set on the bigger picture. Make friendships and stay connected. Attend events and let people know who you are and what you can do.

Alum of the Month: July 2012

Khalil Garriott (G ‘10)

E-mail: khalil.p.garriott@gmail.com, Twitter: @khalilgarriott 
LinkedIn: /khalilgarriott, Website: http://khalilgarriott.com/

Khalil Garriott often tackled sports stories while in the MPS Journalism program, so it’s no surprise that he continues to excel in sports writing. Khalil, who graduated from the program in Fall 2010, currently works as a Website Editor for the National Football League Players Association and writes about NFL-related topics ranging from draft picks and Super Bowl champions to league community service and players’ sidelining injuries. Khalil recently won a 2012 Dateline Award for excellence in local journalism for his story about one Super Bowl-winning football team’s long-overdue trip to the White House. He shared with us his personal and professional gains from the program.

1. Tell us how your degree from the Journalism program has helped you in your current job.
My Master’s degree in Journalism from Georgetown helped elevate me to assume a greater responsibility in my current position. It also gave me the necessary skills to take on different projects at work plus help pass on what I learned in graduate school to others.

2. Why did you pick Georgetown’s Journalism program? How did you hear about us?
When the program was created, it immediately shot up on the list of options on my radar. I believe I originally heard about it through an ad placed in the Washington Post Express newspaper. It didn’t hurt that a friend from undergrad was the director of the program at the time, so I was able to learn more about it and quickly knew it was the right choice.


3. Twitter or Facebook?
Twitter. The only thing that might make me give in to Facebook is the recent birth of my niece…her parents post pictures and videos of her there, so I may eventually relent!

4. Who is your favorite working journalist?
Naturally, I’m partial to the ones that cover sports. I have to respect Adam Schefter,Cindy BorenMike FlorioBill Simmons and Rick Reilly. Plus, the Tony Kornheiser-Michael Wilbon duo is still getting it done.

5. What one piece of advice would you give current students?
Get the most out of the program that you possibly can. Develop and nurture relationships with your classmates, professors and others associated with the program. Stay humble and grounded. Study hard and work hard, but don’t get trapped in the “grad school bubble” and keep your sights set on the bigger picture. Make friendships and stay connected. Attend events and let people know who you are and what you can do.

Read faculty member Paul Singer’s latest USA Today article, “For third-party candidates, playing field is uneven by state.”

Read faculty member Paul Singer’s latest USA Today article, “For third-party candidates, playing field is uneven by state.”